Media

Want to better understand

mental health in students?

We can help.

 

 

A new opportunity to improve children’s mental health care

A new opportunity to improve children’s mental health care

Data show that children are more likely to have mental health disorders than physical ailments, yet most children never receive the care they need because of stigma, cost and a shortage of mental health specialists, according to a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

read more
Medicate or Not?

Medicate or Not?

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Both behavioral therapy, such as parent education and classroom interventions and pharmacological treatments such as central nervous system stimulants can be effective in acute cases, said the group. Combining them can yield better short-term outcomes than using either alone and also enables the use of lower doses of medication.

read more
A Hidden Epidemic of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

A Hidden Epidemic of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Since alcohol use has increased since the pandemic, researchers have found this pattern to also be among pregnant women as well. “Experts estimate that 2% to 5% of U.S. schoolchildren—as many as 1 in 20—may be affected by prenatal alcohol exposure, which can cause complications with growth, behavior, and learning. The effects on individuals and families, as well as the economic costs, are substantial.”

read more
By the Numbers: A Look at Autism

By the Numbers: A Look at Autism

The share of children nationwide diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, according to the most recent estimate from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This is an increase of about 30 percent since 2012.

read more
New Guidelines for ADHD Among Children

New Guidelines for ADHD Among Children

After six years of study, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has expanded its guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to cover both preschoolers and adolescents.

read more
Girls with ADHD Make Realistic Self-appraisals

Girls with ADHD Make Realistic Self-appraisals

Researchers have reported that children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) believe they are coping better socially and in school than they actually are, but Erika Swanson, PhD, has found this to be untrue in girls.

read more
The Brains of Children with Dyslexia Respond Abnormally to Language Stimuli

The Brains of Children with Dyslexia Respond Abnormally to Language Stimuli

Researchers have additional evidence that reading problems are linked to abnormal sound processing, thanks to high-precision pictures of the brain at work. In a recent study, when children without reading problems tried to distinguish between similar spoken syllables, speech areas in the left brain worked much harder than corresponding areas in the right brain, whose function is still unknown.

read more
Undoing Dyslexia via Video Games

Undoing Dyslexia via Video Games

Dyslexia is a language-based learning disability and is often severe enough to make it difficult for children to succeed academically. Treatment for language and reading impairments by speech therapists and reading specialists is often a slow, long, expensive, and frustrating experience for professionals, parents, and children.

read more
Easing ADHD Without Meds

Easing ADHD Without Meds

Psychologists are using research-based behavioral interventions that effectively treat children with ADHD. These interventions focus on teaching parents strategies for helping their children succeed. One such approach is to catch children being good.

read more
A New Device for Treating ADHD in Children

A New Device for Treating ADHD in Children

The first-ever device to treat pediatric attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April. The external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) system offers an alternative treatment option for more than 6 million American children with an ADHD diagnosis.

read more
Helping People with Autism Reach their Full Potential (Part 2)

Helping People with Autism Reach their Full Potential (Part 2)

There are numerous existing therapies and supports that have been successful in helping kids with autism reach their potential, but there are also barriers. Pediatricians sometimes fail to use common screening measures according to the standardized instructions, says Diana Robins, PhD.

read more
A Push for Universal Screening

A Push for Universal Screening

Psychological research informs every decision around autism policy—from which interventions are covered by insurance, to how the educational system teaches children with autism, to what systems should be created to support adults.

read more
Helping People with Autism Reach their Full Potential (Part 3)

Helping People with Autism Reach their Full Potential (Part 3)

Perhaps the most glaring gap for people with autism is the evaporation of support when they reach adulthood. Regional studies suggest unemployment is high among adults with autism. Cognitive abilities are not protective: a study by developmental psychologist Julie Taylor, PhD, of Vanderbilt University, found that autistic adults with no intellectual disabilities were three times more likely than those with autism and an intellectual disability to have no regular daytime activities.

read more
Stimulants Boost Achievement in ADHD Teens

Stimulants Boost Achievement in ADHD Teens

A first-of-its-kind study indicates that stimulant medication, combined with behavioral interventions, improves academic achievement in adolescents with ADHD. Ritalin and other stimulants have long been used as treatments for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in elementary-age children.

read more
Are Preschoolers Being Overmedicated

Are Preschoolers Being Overmedicated

Behavioral therapy is recommended as the first line of treatment for very young children. So why is medication use rising among this group?

The number of U.S. preschoolers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) jumped 56 percent between 2007–08 and 2011–12, according to data from the National Survey of Children’s Health. The number of children ages 2 to 5 taking a psychoactive medication to treat ADHD doubled, the survey found.

read more
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are more common than thought, say researchers at congressional briefing. Many women aren’t fully aware of the risks associated with drinking while pregnant, and the public needs more information on the symptoms and severity of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD).

read more
Helping People with Autism Reach their Full Potential (Part 1)

Helping People with Autism Reach their Full Potential (Part 1)

Approximately, 1 in 59 children are diagnosed with autism in the United States and each year more than 60,000 teenagers with autism age out of the school system and launch into adulthood. Though the behavioral symptoms of autism start to emerge at about 18 months of age, children’s median age at diagnosis remains stubbornly stuck at around ages 4 to 5. Even after diagnosis, many children don’t receive the services they need because of long waitlists for treatment or inadequate insurance.

read more
Young Children with ADHD can Benefit from Behavior Therapy

Young Children with ADHD can Benefit from Behavior Therapy

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging health care providers to refer parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for behavior therapy before prescribing medicine. According to the CDC’s latest Vital Signs report, about 75 percent of young children being treated for ADHD receive medicine, and only about half receive any form of psychological services.

read more
When Parents are Incarcerated, their Children are Punished, too.

When Parents are Incarcerated, their Children are Punished, too.

There is such a large population of children with incarcerated parents in the United States that even “Sesame Street” is addressing the issue. In 2013, the program introduced Alex, a character whose father is in jail, to highlight the stigma and coping difficulties experienced by children of incarcerated parents.

read more
Parents are Models

Parents are Models

While children are growing up and living with their parents, they are constantly observing every move their parents make. They observe so much that they want to be like their parents and that is who they learn the most from. Children learn things that their parents try to teach them, like counting or how to use the bathroom. They also learn from just watching what their parents do and trying to copy them.

read more
Parenting: The Teen Years

Parenting: The Teen Years

Teenagers, dealing with hormone changes and issues of identity, sexuality, and alcohol, may feel that no one can understand their feelings, especially parents. The teen years pose some of the most difficult challenges for families. Teenagers, dealing with hormone changes and an ever-complex world, may feel that no one can understand their feelings, especially parents.

read more
Evidence-Based Practices for Childhood Grief and Trauma

Evidence-Based Practices for Childhood Grief and Trauma

There are several effective evidence-based practices designed to help children or teens who are grieving or experiencing trauma and grief. They include: Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, Multidimensional grief therapy, and Resilient Parenting for Bereaved Families, etc.

read more
Managing Stress for a Healthy Family

Managing Stress for a Healthy Family

An online survey by the American Psychological Association (APA), conducted by Harris Interactive in August 2010, found that 73% of parents report family responsibilities as a significant source of stress. The survey also found that more than two-thirds of parents think their stress level has slight to no impact on their child’s stress level. However, only 14% of tweens and teens reported that they are not bothered when their parents are stressed.

read more
Daily Temper Tantrums Aren’t Normal for Preschoolers

Daily Temper Tantrums Aren’t Normal for Preschoolers

Behavior in young children and what is considered normal for that age Parents may think a 3-year-old frequent tantrums are normal in early childhood. But new research shows daily tantrums only occur in less than 10 percent of preschool children, regardless of gender, socioeconomic status or ethnicity (Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 2012).

read more
What is Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)?

What is Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT)?

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) is an effective form of treatment for PTSD that has developed after experiencing any traumatic event, such as, child abuse, combat, rape, and natural disasters. CPT is generally done over 12 sessions and helps patients learn how to challenge and modify unhelpful beliefs related to the trauma. In doing so, the patient creates a new understanding and conceptualization of the traumatic event so that it reduces its ongoing negative effects on current life.

read more
How to Help Children and Teens Manage Stress

How to Help Children and Teens Manage Stress

The pandemic left mental illness at an all time high, especially among children and teens. “In fact, 71% of parents said the pandemic had taken a toll on their child’s mental health, and 69% said the pandemic was the worst thing to happen to their child, according to a 2020 national survey of 1,000 parents facilitated by the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.”

read more
Does Pretend Play Impact a Child’s Development?

Does Pretend Play Impact a Child’s Development?

Using only the power of their imaginations, children can transform a box into a boat, or a living room into a peril-fraught jungle. But while many famous theorists, including Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky, have posited that pretending fuels children’s intellectual and creative development, that may not be the case, suggests University of Virginia psychology professor Angeline Lillard, PhD, online in Psychological Bulletin.

read more
Facts About Trafficking of Women and Girls

Facts About Trafficking of Women and Girls

“Human trafficking is a global and domestic human rights issue that is characterized by economic exploitation through force, fraud and coercion.” Human trafficking can be to anybody of any age, however, young girls and women are the majority of individuals who are trafficked.

read more
Understanding and Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

Understanding and Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

There is no single cause of child maltreatment and it can come from any type of family, of all incomes, and of all religions. Along with many other consequences, child abuse and neglect can result in physical and psychological harm. A physically abused child may develop aggressive behaviors that lead to recurring maltreatment.

read more
A Hidden Pandemic of COVID-19

A Hidden Pandemic of COVID-19

It is no surprise that losing a parent, loved one, or caregiver can be traumatic and understanding grief can be difficult for any age but specifically, children. This has been magnified through COVID-19.

read more
Effects of Poverty, Hunger, and Homelessness on Children and Youth

Effects of Poverty, Hunger, and Homelessness on Children and Youth

Our nation’s economic status has tremendously affected the lives of millions of Americans. “U.S. Census data reveals that from 2009 to 2010, the total number of children under age 18 living in poverty increased to 16.4 million from 15.5 million.” On that account there has been psychological research to show how poverty negatively impacts children at home, school, and in their communities.

read more
How And Why to Get Children Moving Now

How And Why to Get Children Moving Now

Exercise can feel like one more daunting item on the family to-do list. But encouraging children to move their bodies is important, not only for physical health, but for mental health and cognitive development, too.

read more